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mechanism of action of mta in pulpotomy

A. S. El Meligy and D. R. Avery, “Comparison of mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide as pulpotomy agents in young permanent teeth (apexogenesis),”, D. E. Witherspoon, J. C. Small, and G. Z. Harris, “Mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomies: a case series outcomes assessment,”, M. A. Qudeimat, K. M. Barrieshi-Nusair, and A. I. Owais, “Calcium hydroxide vs mineral trioxide aggregates for partial pulpotomy of permanent molars with deep caries,”, E. T. Koh, T. R. Pitt Ford, S. P. Kariyawasam, N. N. Chen, and M. Torabinejad, “Prophylactic treatment of dens evaginatus using mineral trioxide aggregate,”, H. A. Agamy, N. S. Bakry, M. M. F. Mounir, and D. R. Avery, “Comparison of mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol as pulp-capping agents in pulpotomized primary teeth,”, S. E. Jabbarifar, D. D. Khademi, and D. D. Ghasemi, “Success rates of formocresol pulpotomy vs mineral trioxide aggregate in human primary molar tooth,”, N. Farsi, N. Alamoudi, K. Balto, and A. Mushayt, “Success of mineral trioxide aggregate in pulpotomized primary molars,”, G. Holan, E. Eidelman, and A. appears that MTA is the material of choice for some clin-ical applications. More clinical studies are needed to confirm its efficacy compared with other materials. Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed because existing materials did not have the ideal characteristics for orthograde or retrograde root-end fillings. Calcium hydroxide dissolves in an aqueous environment into calcium and hydroxyl ions creating a high pH in the close environment (~12). 17. The pulpal and periapical responses of dogs’ teeth after pulpotomy and pulp capping with Ca 3 SiO 5, when compared with MTA by radiographic, histopathologic and histomicrobiological analyses, showed that mineralized tissue bridge formation was observed in more specimens treated with Ca 3 SiO 5 (96.8%) than with MTA (72.2%). One less than ideal property of MTA is that it is a slow-setting material like Portland cement. On the basis of available information, it appears that MTA is the material of choice for some clinical applications. MTA also has the ability to interact with phosphate-containing fluids to spontaneously form apatite precipitates, which not only explains its biocompatibility and bioactivity but may also contribute to its sealing ability. However, MTA with the addition of resinous components to allow light curing did not stimulate mineralization when implanted into rat connective tissues [151]. Mixing can be done on paper pad or on a glass slab using a plastic or metal spatula to achieve putty like paste consistency. In addition, Si and Al show an increased concentration within the Ca-leached layer [93], probably resulting from the formation and/or accumulation of insoluble components such as calcium silicate hydrate and ettringite. Mechanism of action MTA filled in root canal was found to leach some ions in the following order: calcium, silica, bismuth, iron, aluminum, and magnesium. also reduces the setting time [149] while maintaining biocompatibility in vitro [150]. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a commonly used dental pulp-capping material with known effects in promoting reparative dentinogenesis. Physical and mechanical properties,”, M. G. Gandolfi, S. Pagani, F. Perut et al., “Innovative silicate-based cements for endodontics: a study of osteoblast-like cell response,”, M. G. Gandolfi, F. Perut, G. Ciapetti, R. Mongiorgi, and C. Prati, “New Portland cement-based materials for endodontics mixed with articaine solution: a study of cellular response,”, S. Asgary, S. Shahabi, T. Jafarzadeh, S. Amini, and S. Kheirieh, “The properties of a new endodontic material,”, S. Asgary, M. J. Eghbal, M. Parirokh, F. Ghanavati, and H. Rahimi, “A comparative study of histologic response to different pulp capping materials and a novel endodontic cement,”, S. Asgary, M. J. Eghbal, and M. Parirokh, “Sealing ability of a novel endodontic cement as a root-end filling material,”. Fan, M. Fan, and Z. Bian, “The effects of sodium hypochlorite (5.25%), chlorhexidine (2%), and glyde file prep on the bond strength of MTA-dentin,”, S. Shinzato, M. Kobayashi, W. F. Mousa et al., “Bioactive bone cement: effect of surface curing properties on bone-bonding strength,”, R. L. Leung, W. J. Loesche, and G. T. Charbeneau, “Effect of Dycal on bacteria in deep carious lesions,”, M. Torabinejad, C. U. Hong, T. R. P. Ford, and J. D. Kettering, “Antibacterial effects of some root end filling materials,”, T. J. Stowe, C. M. Sedgley, B. Stowe, and J. C. Fenno, “The effects of chlorhexidine gluconate (0.12%) on the antimicrobial properties of tooth-colored ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate,”, C. R. Sipert, R. P. Hussne, C. K. Nishiyama, and S. A. Torres, “In vitro antimicrobial activity of Fill Canal, Sealapex, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Portland cement and EndoRez,”, A. U. Eldeniz, H. H. Hadimli, H. Ataoglu, and D. Ørstavik, “Antibacterial effect of selected root-end filling materials,”, K. Al-Hezaimi, T. A. Al-Shalan, J. Naghshbandi, S. Oglesby, J. H. S. Simon, and I. Rotstein, “Antibacterial effect of two mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) preparations against, M. Tanomaru-Filho, J. M. Tanomaru, D. B. Barros, E. Watanabe, and I. Y. Ito, “In vitro antimicrobial activity of endodontic sealers, MTA-based cements and Portland cement,”, S. Asgary and F. A. Kamrani, “Antibacterial effects of five different root canal sealing materials,”, S. Al-Nazhan and A. Al-Judai, “Evaluation of antifungal activity of mineral trioxide aggregate,”, K. Al-Hezaimi, K. Al-Hamdan, J. Naghshbandi, S. Oglesby, J. H. S. Simon, and I. Rotstein, “Effect of white-colored mineral trioxide aggregate in different concentrations on, K. Al-Hezaimi, J. Naghshbandi, S. Oglesby, J. H. S. Simon, and I. Rotstein, “Comparison of antifungal activity of white-colored and gray-colored mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) at similar concentrations against, N. Farsi, N. Alamoudi, K. Balto, and A. Al Mushayt, “Clinical assessment of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as direct pulp capping in young permanent teeth,”, G. Bogen, J. S. Kim, and L. K. Bakland, “Direct pulp capping with mineral trioxide aggregate: an observational study,”, D. Tuna and A. Ölmez, “Clinical long-term evaluation of MTA as a direct pulp capping material in primary teeth,”, K. M. Barrieshi-Nusair and M. A. Qudeimat, “A prospective clinical study of mineral trioxide aggregate for partial pulpotomy in cariously exposed permanent teeth,”, O. 1999) and it was postulated that the mechanisms of action of MTA, PC and calcium WMTA exposed to a water-soluble dye before achieving full set showed poorer adaptation and more leakage compared with those of IRM and Super EBA cements [115]. Since carbonated apatite represents the biological apatite phases found in bone, cementum, and dentin, this apatite layer may play a triggering role in the dentinogenic activity of MTA by supporting new tissue formation and its integration into dentin-like tissue. Similar to calcium hydroxide-based materials, the antimicrobial action of MTA is most likely associated with elevated pH resulting from ionization that releases hydroxyl ions. Method: MTA was performed in two visits treatment protocol on direct pulp capping in adult.. 2004; Nakayama et al. He, G. N. Glickman, and I. Watanabe, “The effects of various additives on setting properties of MTA,”, B. S. Ber, J. F. Hatton, and G. P. Stewart, “Chemical modification of ProRoot MTA to improve handling characteristics and decrease setting time,”, K. B. Wiltbank, S. A. Schwartz, and W. G. Schindler, “Effect of selected accelerants on the physical properties of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement,”, E. A. Bortoluzzi, N. J. Broon, C. M. Bramante, W. T. Felippe, M. Tanomaru Filho, and R. M. Esberard, “The influence of calcium chloride on the setting time, solubility, disintegration, and pH of mineral trioxide aggregate and white Portland cement with a radiopacifier,”, E. A. Bortoluzzi, N. J. Broon, C. M. Bramante, R. B. Garcia, I. G. de Moraes, and N. Bernardineli, “Sealing ability of MTA and radiopaque Portland cement with or without calcium chloride for root-end filling,”, T.-H. Huang, M.-Y. Mineral trioxide aggregate By Hyder Mohammed 2. NEC is reported to show a shorter setting time [155], better handling properties, and a similar sealing ability [157] compared with those of MTA. Many studies have addressed MTA as a potential alternative to formocresol pulpotomy in primary teeth. A porosity increase and the formation of a Ca-leached layer have also been reported for Portland cement [94, 95] and thus these properties are derived from the parent material. Nevertheless, in vitro studies suggest the presence of dentinogenic mechanisms specific to MTA, since MTA can stimulate hard tissue-forming cells to induce matrix formation and mineralization. RESUMO Holland R, Souza V, Nery MJ, Faraco Júnior IM, Bernabé PFE, Otoboni Filho JA, Dezan Junior E. Reação do tecido conjuntivo do rato ao implante de tubos de dentina obturados com um agregado de trióxido mineral branco. We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content and ads. [40]). Mechanism of action of Formocresol Aim to create a chemically altered zone at the pulp-medicament interface - leaving the deeper untreated pulp tissue vital and un-inflamed Diffuses into the pulp tissue - degree of penetration is time and dose dependent Dr. Jens O. Andreasen. MTA is also used as a pulpotomy dressing for primary teeth and is considered an appropriate alternative to formocresol, since studies comparing MTA and formocresol consistently showed that MTA gave similar to better results both clinically and radiographically [137–143]. Tomson et al showed that GMTA and WMTA release different signaling molecules from dentin, powder that might influence 13. Introduction: The main aim during any dental treatment is to maintain vital pulp as long as possible.Objective: The aim of this study was to assess clinically the use of MTA in direct pulp capping in adult patient. That was when MTA came into light. Among these, NEC (new endodontic cement) is a novel endodontic material consisting of different calcium compounds (i.e., calcium oxide, calcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, calcium silicate, calcium sulfate, calcium hydroxide, and calcium chloride) [155–157]. (2001) advocated that the powder water ratio for MTA should be 3:1(P: W). This appears to be a common characteristic of calcium silicate-containing biomaterials [106, 107]. The human studies with ferric sulfate are … Moreover, Ca ions are continuously released, and the medium maintains a high pH [46–49]. Sign up here as a reviewer to help fast-track new submissions. •Its mechanism of action is the cauterization of the superficial pulp tissue Sheller B. Electrosurgical pulpotomy: a pilot study in humans. 3 A recent report has documented that the addition of [1] The minimally invasive endodontic techniques of vital pulp therapy (VPT) are based on improved understanding of the capacity of pulp (nerve) tissues to heal and regenerate plus the availability of advanced endodontic materials. Success rates of 100% can be attributed to smaller sample size or wider range of patients (5-12 years), which can reduce validity and reliability of results. The purpose of Part III of this literature review is to present a comprehensive list of articles regarding animal studies, clinical applications, drawbacks, and mechanism of action of MTA. Lee, M. Monsef, and M. Torabinejad, “Sealing ability of a mineral trioxide aggregate for repair of lateral root perforations,”, M. Torabinejad and N. Chivian, “Clinical applications of mineral trioxide aggregate,”, N. K. Sarkar, R. Caicedo, P. Ritwik, R. Moiseyeva, and I. Kawashima, “Physicochemical basis of the biologic properties of mineral trioxide aggregate,”, J. Camilleri, F. E. Montesin, K. Brady, R. Sweeney, R. V. Curtis, and T. R. P. Ford, “The constitution of mineral trioxide aggregate,”, T. Dammaschke, H. U. V. Gerth, H. Züchner, and E. Schäfer, “Chemical and physical surface and bulk material characterization of white ProRoot MTA and two Portland cements,”, S. Asgary, M. Parirokh, M. J. Eghbal, and F. Brink, “Chemical differences between white and gray mineral trioxide aggregate,”, T. Yamamura, “Differentiation of pulpal cells and inductive influences of various matrices with reference to pulpal wound healing,”, D. Tziafas, “Mechanisms controlling secondary initiation of dentinogenesis: a review,”, M. Goldberg and A. J. Smith, “Cells and extracellular matrices of dentin and pulp: a biological basis for repair and tissue engineering,”, I. Thesleff and K. Hurmerinta, “Tissue interactions in tooth development,”, J. V. Ruch, “Odontoblast differentiation and the formation of the odontoblast layer,”, J. V. Ruch, “Odontoblasts: developmental aspects,” in, H. Lesot, M. Osman, and J. V. Ruch, “Immunofluorescent localization of collagens, fibronectin, and laminin during terminal differentiation of odontoblasts,”, H. Lesot, M.-D. Kubler, J. L. Fausser, and J.-V. Ruch, “A 165 kDa membrane antigen mediating fibronectin-vinculin interaction is involved in murine odontoblast differentiation,”, A. Veis, “The role of dental pulp—thoughts on the session on pulp repair processes,”, K. Yoshiba, N. Yoshiba, H. Nakamura, M. Iwaku, and H. Ozawa, “Immunolocalization of fibronectin during reparative dentinogenesis in human teeth after pulp capping with calcium hydroxide,”, M. Mizuno and Y. Banzai, “Calcium ion release from calcium hydroxide stimulated fibronectin gene expression in dental pulp cells and the differentiation of dental pulp cells to mineralized tissue forming cells by fibronectin,”, Y.-C. Hwang, I.-N. Hwang, W.-M. Oh, J.-C. Park, D.-S. Lee, and H.-H. ability of MTA[13]. ScienceDirect ® is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V. ScienceDirect ® is a registered trademark of Elsevier B.V. MTA in Pulpotomy Pulpotomy procedure involves removing only part of the pulp ,eliminatingtissues that have inflammatory or degenerative changes and leavingintact the underlying healthy pulp [ 23 ]. Storm, F. C. Eichmiller, P. A. Tordik, and G. G. Goodell, “Setting expansion of gray and white mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland Cement,”, M. Torabinejad, P. W. Smith, J. D. Kettering, and T. R. Pitt Ford, “Comparative investigation of marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate and other commonly used root-end filling materials,”, E. Gondim Jr., A. Pulpotomy is a minimally invasive procedure performed in children on a primary tooth with extensive caries but without evidence of root pathology. VI. We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. Mechanism of action of Formocresol Aim to create a chemically altered zone at the pulp-medicament interface - leaving the deeper untreated pulp tissue vital and un-inflamed Diffuses into the pulp tissue - degree of penetration is time and dose dependent potomy agent. MTA has been shown to promote a variety of positive cellular responses in vitro when applied directly to the dental pulp (Bonson et al. MTA has taken the place More clinical studies are needed to confirm its efficacy compared with other materials. MIC 349 2009 MTA pulpotomy of human permanent molars with irreversible pulpitis.---350 2009 Negligible expression of arsenic in some commercially INTRODUCTION Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed for use as a dental root repair material by Dr. Mahmoud Torabinejad, (MTA) is the most commonly recommended material for sealing communications between the root canal system and the periodontium and was formulated from commercial Portland cement combined with … 3, Fig. A. Otoboni Filho, P. F. E. Bernabé, and E. Dezan Jr., “Reaction of rat connective tissue to implanted dentin tubes filled with mineral trioxide aggregate or calcium hydroxide,”, M. Lotfi, S. Vosoughhosseini, M. A. Saghiri, M. Mesgariabbasi, and B. Ranjkesh, “Effect of white mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with disodium hydrogen phosphate on inflammatory cells,”, T. R. Pitt Ford, M. Torabinejad, H. R. Abedi, L. K. Bakland, and S. P. Kariyawasam, “Using mineral trioxide aggregate: as a pulp-capping material,”, I. M. Faraco Jr. and R. Holland, “Response of the pulp of dogs to capping with mineral trioxide aggregate or a calcium hydroxide cement,”, R. Holland, V. de Souza, S. S. Murata et al., “Healing process of dog dental pulp after pulpotomy and pulp covering with mineral trioxide aggregate or Portland cement,”, D. Tziafas, O. Pantelidou, A. Alvanou, G. Belibasakis, and S. Papadimitriou, “The dentinogenic effect of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in short-term capping experiments,”, W. E. Andelin, S. Shabahang, K. Wright, and M. Torabinejad, “Identification of hard tissue after experimental pulp capping using dentin sialoprotein (DSP) as a marker,”, M. S. Dominguez, D. E. Witherspoon, J. L. Gutmann, and L. A. Opperman, “Histological and scanning electron microscopy assessment of various vital pulp-therapy materials,”, R. Menezes, C. M. Bramante, A. Letra, V. G. G. Carvalho, and R. B. Garcia, “Histologic evaluation of pulpotomies in dog using two types of mineral trioxide aggregate and regular and white Portland cements as wound dressings,”, M. Parirokh, S. Asgary, M. J. Eghbal, and F. Brink, “A comparative study of white and grey mineral trioxide aggregate as pulp capping agents in dog's teeth,”, S. Simon, P. Cooper, A. Smith, B. Picard, C. Naulin Ifi, and A. Berdal, “Evaluation of a new laboratory model for pulp healing: preliminary study,”, E. A. Bortoluzzi, N. J. Broon, C. M. Bramante et al., “Mineral trioxide aggregate with or without calcium chloride in psulpotomy,”, M. Aeinehchi, B. Eslami, M. Ghanbariha, and A. S. Saffar, “Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide as pulp-capping agents in human teeth: a preliminary report,”, V. Chacko and S. Kurikose, “Human pulpal response to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA): a histologic study,”, C. E. Iwamoto, E. Adachi, C. H. Pameijer, D. Barnes, E. E. Romberg, and S. Jefferies, “Clinical and histological evaluation of white ProRoot MTA in direct pulp capping,”, M. d. L. R. Accorinte, R. Holland, A. Reis et al., “Evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide cement as pulp-capping agents in human teeth,”, P. N. R. Nair, H. F. Duncan, T. R. Pitt Ford, and H. U. Luder, “Histological, ultrastructural and quantitative investigations on the response of healthy human pulps to experimental capping with mineral trioxide aggregate: a randomized controlled trial,”, M. L. R. Accorinte, A. D. Loguercio, A. Reis et al., “Response of human dental pulp capped with MTA and calcium hydroxide powder,”, L. Sawicki, C. H. Pameijer, K. Emerich, and B. Adamowicz-Klepalska, “Histological evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide in direct pulp capping of human immature permanent teeth,”, M. L. R. Accorinte, A. D. Loguercio, A. Reis et al., “Evaluation of two mineral trioxide aggregate compounds as pulp-capping agents in human teeth,”, M. J. Eghbal, S. Asgary, R. A. Baglue, M. Parirokh, and J. Ghoddusi, “MTA pulpotomy of human permanent molars with irreversible pulpitis,”, D. Abdullah, T. R. Pitt Ford, S. Papaioannou, J. Nicholson, and F. McDonald, “An evaluation of accelerated Portland cement as a restorative material,”, I. Islam, H. Kheng Chng, and A. U. J. Yap, “Comparison of the physical and mechanical properties of MTA and portland cement,”, M. Torabinejad, C. U. Hong, F. McDonald, and T. R. Pitt Ford, “Physical and chemical properties of a new root-end filling material,”, M. H. Nekoofar, G. Adusei, M. S. Sheykhrezae, S. J. Hayes, S. T. Bryant, and P. M. H. Dummer, “The effect of condensation pressure on selected physical properties of mineral trioxide aggregate,”, J. Camilleri, “Hydration mechanisms of mineral trioxide aggregate,”, Y.-L. Lee, B.-S. Lee, F.-H. Lin, A. Y. Lin, W.-H. Lan, and C.-P. Lin, “Effects of physiological environments on the hydration behavior of mineral trioxide aggregate,”, L. Gancedo-Caravia and E. Garcia-Barbero, “Influence of humidity and setting time on the push-out strength of mineral trioxide aggregate obturations,”, A. M. Montellano, S. A. Schwartz, and T. J. Beeson, “Contamination of tooth-colored mineral trioxide aggregate used as a root-end filling material: a bacterial leakage study,”, R. A. VanderWeele, S. A. Schwartz, and T. J. Beeson, “Effect of blood contamination on retention characteristics of MTA when mixed with different liquids,”, S. R. Sluyk, P. C. Moon, and G. R. Hartwell, “Evaluation of setting properties and retention characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate when used as a furcation perforation repair material,”, G. Danesh, T. Dammaschke, H. U. V. Gerth, T. Zandbiglari, and E. Schäfer, “A comparative study of selected properties of ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate and two Portland cements,”, C. Poggio, M. Lombardini, C. Alessandro, and R. Simonetta, “Solubility of root-end-filling materials: a comparative study,”, A. Bodanezi, N. Carvalho, D. Silva et al., “Immediate and delayed solubility of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement,”, M. Kuratate, Y. Shigetani, L. Han, and T. Okiji, “Compositional change of mineral trioxide aggregate immersed in water: alteration of elemental distribution in the surface layer,”, C. Carde, R. François, and J.-M. Torrenti, “Leaching of both calcium hydroxide and C-S-H from cement paste: modeling the mechanical behavior,”, K. Haga, M. Shibata, M. Hironaga, S. Tanaka, and S. Nagasaki, “Change in pore structure and composition of hardened cement paste during the process of dissolution,”, P. Hørsted-Bindslev and H. Løvschall, “Treatment outcome of vital pulp treatment,”, G. Bergenholtz, “Evidence for bacterial causation of adverse pulpal responses in resin-based dental restorations,”, A. H. B. Schuurs, R. J. M. Gruythuysen, and P. R. Wesselink, “Pulp capping with adhesive resin-based composite vs. calcium hydroxide: a review,”, T. B. Bozeman, R. R. Lemon, and P. D. Eleazer, “Elemental analysis of crystal precipitate from gray and white MTA,”, F. R. Tay and D. H. Pashley, “Guided tissue remineralisation of partially demineralised human dentine,”, P. Taddei, A. Tinti, M. G. Gandolfi, P. L. Rossi, and C. Prati, “Vibrational study on the bioactivity of Portland cement-based materials for endodontic use,”, T. Kokubo, “Bioactive glass ceramics: properties and applications,”, T. Kasuga, “Bioactive calcium pyrophosphate glasses and glass-ceramics,”, M.-K. Wu, E. G. Kontakiotis, and P. R. Wesselink, “Long-term seal provided by some root-end filling materials,”, X. Liu, C. Ding, and P. K. Chu, “Mechanism of apatite formation on wollastonite coatings in simulated body fluids,”, K. Ohura, T. Nakamura, T. Yamamuro et al., “Bone-bonding ability of, H. K. Chng, I. Islam, A. U. Yap, Y. W. Tong, and E. T. Koh, “Properties of a new root-end filling material,”, I. Islam, H. K. Chng, and A. U. J. Yap, “Comparison of the physical and mechanical properties of MTA and portland cement,”, B. 2005; Tani-Ishii et al. Overall, the clinical outcome of direct pulp capping and pulpotomy with MTA seems quite favorable, although the number of controled prospective studies is still limited. We are committed to sharing findings related to COVID-19 as quickly as possible. PULPOTOMY PROCEDURES IN PRIMARY DENTITION . J … MTA is also used as a pulpotomy dressing for primary teeth and is considered an appropriate alternative to formocresol, since studies comparing MTA and formocresol consistently showed that MTA gave similar to better results both clinically and radiographically [137–143]. [58] examined the precipitates on various PBS-immersed MTA preparations and Portland cements by means of SEM and XRD and found the presence of amorphous calcium phosphate crystals of different morphologies and Ca/P ratios, which may act as precursors during the formation of carbonated apatite. Use of MTA as a pulpotomy agent in permanent teeth has demonstrated excellent histological and clinical results.4,7,12,13 MTA has demonstrated acceptable biocompatibility, sealing ability and the ability to promote healing in8, Resource Centre for Rare Oral Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark Tel. Vol. 33 The aim of pulpotomy was to retain a symptom-free, functional primary tooth until it reaches the age of its physiologic exfoliation Mode of action in pulp capping and pulpotomy. MTA is a promising material for root-end filling, perforation repair, vital pulp therapy, and apical barrier formation for teeth with necrotic pulps and open apexes. A. Zaia, B. P. F. A. Gomes, C. C. R. Ferraz, F. B. Teixeira, and F. J. Souza-Filho, “Investigation of the marginal adaptation of root-end filling materials in root-end cavities prepared with ultrasonic tips,”, G. Shipper, E. S. Grossman, A. J. Botha, and P. E. Cleaton-Jones, “Marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) compared with amalgam as a root-end filling material: a low-vacuum (LV) versus high-vacuum (HV) SEM study,”, C. B. Xavier, R. Weismann, M. G. de Oliveira, F. F. Demarco, and D. H. Pozza, “Root-end filling materials: apical microleakage and marginal adaptation,”, S. I. Tobón-Arroyave, M. M. Restrepo-Peérez, J. This can act as a nidus for the formation of calcified structures after the use of this material in endodontic treatments. Thus, action potential shape analysis could be a valuable tool for the measurement of drug effects based on their cellular mechanism of action. 2007). Sarkar et al. The marginal adaptation of MTA is in general better than that of traditional materials [111–114], although one study [114] reported that marginal adaptation did not correlate with leakage. MTA 1. / Tay, Franklin R. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Dentistry: From Preparation to Application. MTA has a similar mechanism of action to calcium hydroxide 11 in that the main component of the material, calcium oxide, when in contact with a humid environment, is converted into calcium hydroxide.

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